Category Archives: Usability

Anatomy of a Basic UX Project

Productivity and time management apps have been huge on smartphones in the last few years, and as a big fan of any kind of list-making or diary tool, I really enjoy playing with such apps. One of the most interesting ones out there is Lift, an app for goal-setting.

lift-iphones1

During a class I took last fall at UW, I got a chance to dive in and do some user research on it with a team, so I thought I’d do a little blog post about that.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Question Writing 101 from Joe Dumas

I created and presented this summary as part of my usability testing class (HCDE 517) at the University of Washington. It covers basic question writing concepts that are applicable to both market researchers and usability researchers.

For me, the highlight of this article was Joe’s discussion on labeling the end points of scales. He reminds even us experienced question writers that: one’s choice of scale end points might activate two different cognitive structures instead of one. Measuring something as being “difficult” is not the same as measuring it as being “not at all easy”.

How Market Research Experience Can Mislead You in Usability Studies

Diving into the emerging field of usability research after nearly a decade in traditional market research, I’ve learned that some concepts and processes are similar in both fields (e.g., surveys). There are, however, more differences than I expected. For example, when I first heard the term usability testing I translated that in my mind as in-depth interview. As I’ll discuss in a minute, there are significant differences even though the two concepts are related. Continue reading

Sauro’s 4 Steps to Translating a Questionnaire

The process for translating questionnaires is one thing that is exactly the same in Market and Usability Research. Jeff Sauro, a highly regarded usability professional, posted “4 Steps to Translating a Questionnaire” on his blog last month. Continue reading